Nike Lives in Theory
blackfashion:

Lisa Marie, 21, Austin, TexasInstagram:@lisaxxmarie
Tumblr: foreverzurimodels.tumblr.com

Photographed by: Candice Ghai 

blackfashion:

Lisa Marie, 21, Austin, Texas
Instagram:@lisaxxmarie

Tumblr: foreverzurimodels.tumblr.com

Photographed by: Candice Ghai 

blackfashion:

Brenda, Toronto. Dress by Tehilah designs
IG:theonlyskinnybish
http://canneverbeaskinnybish2.blogspot.com/

blackfashion:

Brenda, Toronto. Dress by Tehilah designs

IG:theonlyskinnybish

http://canneverbeaskinnybish2.blogspot.com/

thickneyspears:

Azealia is so Perfect !

thelovenotebook:

More good vibes here

I don’t know why this was sad to read.

thelovenotebook:

More good vibes here

I don’t know why this was sad to read.

thelovenotebook:

Good Vibes HERE
iammrkenny:

Yes.

concernedresidentofbakerstreet:

i think we found the opposite of nash greir

what-id-wear:

(source : Bisous Natasha )
blackscientistsandinventors:

Dovie Lacy

 In high school I was an honor student, but it was not until March 1977 (during my junior year) that the topic of my going to college came up. On that fateful day, I walked into my guidance counselor’s office and he said, “Dovie, you are good in math and science; do you want to be an engineer?” I responded, “I don’t think so; don’t engineers drive trains?” He explained that engineers use the principles of math and science to design things like planes and machines. That got my attention. While growing up, not only did I ask a lot of “why” questions, but I was also a tinkerer, always taking things apart (radios, watches, roller skates) and doing experiments. 
Back to that fateful day in 1977: That afternoon, we attended a Minority Engineering Forum at Cleveland State University and ended up sitting next to the Minority Engineering Program Manager from Southern University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. This gentleman asked my guidance counselor whether he know anyone who wanted to be an engineer and would be interested in spending six weeks at Southern University at an Engineering Summer Institute. My guidance counselor said yes, she would, and as they say, the rest is history!MORE @ Women at NASA

blackscientistsandinventors:

Dovie Lacy

 In high school I was an honor student, but it was not until March 1977 (during my junior year) that the topic of my going to college came up. On that fateful day, I walked into my guidance counselor’s office and he said, “Dovie, you are good in math and science; do you want to be an engineer?” I responded, “I don’t think so; don’t engineers drive trains?” He explained that engineers use the principles of math and science to design things like planes and machines. That got my attention. While growing up, not only did I ask a lot of “why” questions, but I was also a tinkerer, always taking things apart (radios, watches, roller skates) and doing experiments.

Back to that fateful day in 1977: That afternoon, we attended a Minority Engineering Forum at Cleveland State University and ended up sitting next to the Minority Engineering Program Manager from Southern University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. This gentleman asked my guidance counselor whether he know anyone who wanted to be an engineer and would be interested in spending six weeks at Southern University at an Engineering Summer Institute. My guidance counselor said yes, she would, and as they say, the rest is history!MORE @ Women at NASA

dynamicafrica:

OROMA ELEWA x BANTU WAX: The Bantu Babe Series

A collection of picturesque beach images featuring Oroma Elewa and a friend on Mikadi Beach in Kigamboni, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, wearing pieces designed by Yodit Eklund for Bantu Wax. Art direction was also done by Oroma Elewa herself.

Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter

All Africa, All the time.